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Hurricane Update: Florida’s Fuel Receiving Ports Reopening

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 14, 2017

Noteworthy energy-related updates from Florida officials and the U.S. Energy Department (DOE), as the state continues to recover after Hurricane Irma:

  • Ports including Port Everglades, Jacksonville and Tampa have reopened. This is important because, with Florida having no refineries of its own, fuel reaches the state mostly via water transport. These ports typically receive more than 640,000 barrels per day of fuels, including gasoline, distillate, jet fuel, bunker fuel and fuel oil, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration:

florida_fuel_supply_flows


  • DOE reports a number of oil product tankers were expected to arrive in these ports.
  • No issues have been reported with any key pipelines transporting petroleum products across the affected region, DOE reports.
  • The Florida Highway Patrol continues dedicate troopers as escorts for fuel resupply trucks traveling to communities in need, according to Florida Gov. Rick Scott:

Here’s a link to some useful information about resupplying retail fuel outlets. (BTW, here's a link on staying safe at the fuel pumps.)

While the recovery in Florida – as well as the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast – will continue over weeks and months, the points above indicate the state’s fuel supply remains a top priority and is being served with the help of industry and state and local officials. This is encouraging, given Irma’s Sunday landfall

The historic resiliency of our energy supply system is a part of that – the ability and flexibility of markets to adjust and help areas where fuel product needs are acute. As energy expert Guy Caruso said during an API-hosted conference call before Irma struck land:

“The history and what we’re seeing right now shows that the oil industry and the government – the federal government and the state government – is going to move heaven and earth to make sure that the energy disruptions are as short as possible.”


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Mark Green joined API after a career in newspaper journalism, including 16 years as national editorial writer for The Oklahoman in the paper’s Washington bureau. Mark also was a reporter, copy editor and sports editor. He earned his journalism degree from the University of Oklahoma and master’s in journalism and public affairs from American University. He and his wife Pamela live in Occoquan, Va., where they enjoy their four grandchildren.