The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Informing Voters on Energy

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 24, 2015

Oil Industry Launches 2016 Campaign

Houston Chronicle The oil industry’s leading trade group on Tuesday kicked off its 2016 political campaigning, with plans to air issue advertising and hold events in battleground states.

pumpjackThe American Petroleum Institute launched its “Vote 4 Energy” with a pledge to stay above the partisan fray while ensuring that energy policy is part of the political discussion leading up to the November 2016 elections.

The group released a Wood Mackenzie study that it said illustrated the stark choice facing voters, by modeling how two different regulatory approaches to oil and gas would affect domestic production of those fossil fuels and economic activity related to them.

Under a relatively hands-off scenario with “pro-development” policies, the United States would gain 2.3 million U.S. jobs and $443 billion in economic activity by 2035, according to the API-commissioned analysis. Oil and natural gas production, meanwhile, would jump by 8 million barrels of oil equivalent per day, the study predicted.

A scenario heavy with regulatory constraints, including looming ozone standards, newly imposed rules for hydraulic fracturing on federal lands and proposed requirements meant to boost the safety of offshore wells, generates a different outcome, with Wood Mackenzie predicting a loss of 830,000 jobs and $133 billion in gross domestic product.

Read more: http://bit.ly/1Ni3Uvz

Additional “Vote4Energy” coverage: The Hill, Financial Times (subscription req’d), Oil & Gas Journal, Washington Examiner

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Mark Green joined API after a career in newspaper journalism, including 16 years as national editorial writer for The Oklahoman in the paper’s Washington bureau. Mark also was a reporter, copy editor and sports editor. He earned his journalism degree from the University of Oklahoma and master’s in journalism and public affairs from American University. He and his wife Pamela live in Occoquan, Va., where they enjoy their four grandchildren.