The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

State Polls: Energy Important to Voters

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 14, 2014

Energy figures to be an important voting issue come November in a number of key states, new polling indicates. In separate surveys conducted by Harris Poll registered voters in Florida, Missouri, New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania – 70 percent or more in each state – said they are more likely to favor a candidate who supports increasing oil and natural gas production and energy infrastructure. For example, charting the New York result on the candidate/energy question:

new_york

Another result that could generate traction in this fall’s elections: More than 60 percent of registered voters in each of the states said they think the federal government doesn’t do enough to encourage the development of the nation’s energy infrastructure. For example, the breakdown on that question by age and party from Missouri:

age_party

Overall, strong majorities of registered voters in these states want more oil and natural gas production here at home and more development of energy infrastructure – as demonstrated in poll after poll showing strong support for the Keystone XL pipeline. Karen Moreau, executive director of API’s New York State Petroleum Council:

“New York voters, regardless of party affiliation, want more American-made energy. Voters are more likely to support candidates who will invest in energy infrastructure to produce and transport more of America’s energy. New Yorkers recognize the importance of producing more oil and natural gas in the United States and want opportunities to create new American jobs and boost state economies, benefits sorely needed in upstate New York.”

Detail from the state results:

Florida

  • 81 percent support increased development of the country’s energy infrastructure. (Democrats 74 percent; Republicans 83 percent; Independents 86 percent)
  • 73 percent support increased production of domestic oil and natural gas resources located here in the U.S.
  • 72 percent are more likely to support a candidate in November’s election who supports increasing the country’s energy infrastructure and producing more oil and natural gas from here in the U.S. (Democrats 64 percent; Republicans 85 percent; Independents 68 percent)
  • 62 percent think that the federal government does not do enough to encourage the development of the country’s energy infrastructure.

shareableMissouri

  • 83 percent support increased development of the country’s energy infrastructure. (Democrats 79 percent; Republicans 89 percent; Independents 86 percent)
  • 81 percent support increased production of domestic oil and natural gas resources located here in the U.S.
  • 75 percent are more likely to support a candidate in November’s election who supports increasing the country’s energy infrastructure and producing more oil and natural gas from here in the U.S. (Democrats 62 percent; Republicans 90 percent; Independents 79 percent)
  • 67 percent think that the federal government does not do enough to encourage the development of the country’s energy infrastructure

New York

  • 87 percent support increased development of the country’s energy infrastructure. (Democrats 83 percent; Republicans 92 percent; Independents 84 percent)
  • 69 percent support increased production of domestic oil and natural gas resources located here in the U.S.
  • 73 percent are more likely to support a candidate in November’s election who supports increasing the country’s energy infrastructure and producing more oil and natural gas from here in the U.S. (Democrats 70 percent; Republicans 87 percent; Independents 68 percent)
  • 69 percent think that the federal government does not do enough to encourage the development of the country’s energy infrastructure

New Jersey

  • 83 percent support increased development of the country’s energy infrastructure. (Democrats 76 percent; Republicans 88 percent; Independents 88 percent)
  • 70 percent support increased production of domestic oil and natural gas resources located here in the U.S.
  • 76 percent are more likely to support candidates in November’s elections who support increasing the country’s energy infrastructure and producing more oil and natural gas from here in the U.S. (Democrats 74 percent; Republicans 83 percent; Independents 71 percent)
  • 66 percent think that the federal government does not do enough to encourage the development of the country’s energy infrastructure

Pennsylvania

  • 82 percent support increased development of the country’s energy infrastructure. (Democrats 77 percent; Republicans 90 percent; Independents 79 percent)
  • 72 percent support increased production of domestic oil and natural gas resources located here in the U.S.
  • 70 percent are more likely to support a candidate in November’s election who supports increasing the country’s energy infrastructure and producing more oil and natural gas from here in the U.S. (Democrats 61 percent; Republicans 81 percent; Independents 66 percent)
  • 70 percent think that the federal government does not do enough to encourage the development of the country’s energy infrastructure

Stephanie Catarino Wissman, executive director of API’s Associated Petroleum Industries of Pennsylvania:

“People in the ‘Keystone State’ recognize the abundance of energy that lies in the Marcellus Shale and want to capitalize on the opportunity to benefit all Americans, by investing in the commonwealth’s ability to transport natural gas to consumers nationwide.”

Public support for increased domestic oil and natural gas development and the nation’s energy infrastructure is bipartisan and deep, showing up without regard to age or gender – which is why energy is seen by registered voters as important in their choice of a candidate.

The results likely reflect recognition by Americans that the U.S. energy revolution – which is creating jobs, stimulating economic growth and increasing our energy security – demands visionary leadership and proactive policies to continue into the future.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Mark Green joined API after a career in newspaper journalism, including 16 years as national editorial writer for The Oklahoman in the paper’s Washington bureau. Mark also was a reporter, copy editor and sports editor. He earned his journalism degree from the University of Oklahoma and master’s in journalism and public affairs from American University. He and his wife Pamela live in Occoquan, Va., where they enjoy their four grandchildren.