The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

East Coast Voters Look Offshore for Energy

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 17, 2013

Three more polls, three more states where strong majorities support oil and natural gas drilling off America’s coasts – for jobs, a stronger economy and a more-secure energy future.

Harris Interactive surveys conducted recently in Florida, North Carolina and South Carolina found support for offshore drilling among registered voters ranged from 64 percent (Florida) to 77 percent (South Carolina). As was true earlier this week in a poll of Virginia voters on offshore drilling, developing offshore energy goes along with the belief that more access to U.S. energy reserves and more drilling will lead to significant economic benefits and increased U.S. energy security. More polling results from the three states:

  • Agree that increased production of domestic oil and natural gas resources could help strengthen America’s energy security:  FL 88 percent; NC 89 percent; SC 87 percent.
  • Agree that increased production of domestic oil and natural gas resources could lead to more jobs in the U.S.: FL 92 percent; NC 91 percent; SC 93 percent.
  • Agree that producing more domestic oil and natural gas could help lower energy costs for consumers: FL 83 percent; NC 80 percent; SC 87 percent.
  • Agree that increased production of domestic oil and natural gas resources could help stimulate the economy: FL 89 percent; NC 87 percent; SC 91 percent.
  • Agree that producing more domestic oil and natural gas could benefit federal and state budgets through lease payments, royalty fees and other sources of revenue:  FL 83 percent; NC 81 percent; SC 81 percent
  • Support for increased production of domestic oil and natural gas resources located here in the U.S.:  FL 73 percent; NC 77 percent; SC 78 percent.

These numbers are a great big clue for policymakers in Washington as they consider allowing new seismic surveying off the coasts of the four Mid-Atlantic states. Significant majorities of people living in those states – majorities that cut across party lines – view America’s energy wealth as the catalyst for  greater individual and national prosperity. A game-changer.

Dave Mica of the Florida Petroleum Council:

“Floridians and residents of other coastal states are in the same boat in support of offshore drilling. We can create good-paying jobs and strengthen our local economy by allowing more oil and natural gas production here in the Sunshine State. As Governor Scott just announced in Daytona Beach, an oil and gas technology firm will add 100 jobs in our state to support exploration and production in other states. The multiplier effect for high tech and engineering jobs will be tremendous if additional access to exploration is granted in Florida both onshore and offshore.”

David McGowan of the North Carolina Petroleum Council:

“North Carolina voters continue to support energy production in this state. The path from the earliest phase of planning an offshore lease sale to the first day of production can take more than 10 years. North Carolina has the opportunity to produce energy off its coast and create jobs to fuel our economy while also ensuring the protection of the environmental resources that make our state such a special place.”

Kay Clamp of the South Carolina Petroleum Council:

“South Carolinians want every opportunity to create jobs and boost the state economy. The United States is leading the world in energy development, and allowing South Carolina to produce offshore energy could mean increased revenues to ease the pressure on government budgets.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Mark Green joined API after a career in newspaper journalism, including 16 years as national editorial writer for The Oklahoman in the paper’s Washington bureau. Mark also was a reporter, copy editor and sports editor. He earned his journalism degree from the University of Oklahoma and master’s in journalism and public affairs from American University. He and his wife Pamela live in Occoquan, Va., where they enjoy their four grandchildren.