The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Today - April 15, 2011

Rayola Dougher

Rayola Dougher
Posted April 15, 2011

NorthCentralPA.com: USA Today Analysis Shows Marcellus-Related Jobs in Pa. Continue to Grow As Nation's Workforce Hits 30-Year Low: The nation's economic outlook, by most metrics, is grim. In Pennsylvania, modest overall employment growth is projected over the next year, the USA Today reports. Yet there's a silver lining. While many industries have experienced cutbacks and lower rates of projected job growth, Pennsylvania's 'Natural resources & mining' and 'Professional & business services' -- at respective rates of 4.0% and 3.2% -- continue to be leading sources of job creation in the Commonwealth...We call it the 'Marcellus Multiplier' - the powerful supply chain, made up of a host of small and mid-sized businesses, that plays a critical role in enabling the responsible development of clean-burning American natural gas from up to 9,000 feet below ground. American Solutions: The Challenges for America's Natural Gas Future: A powerful economy relies on affordable and available energy, and America's massive natural gas resources will play an integral part in helping our economy recover and grow. Pennsylvania is a case in point: In many areas of the commonwealth the impact of the recent recession was lessened, sometimes significantly, due to the growth and expansion of natural gas production. In rural areas and small towns, hotels are filled to capacity with guests. Local revenues have skyrocketed as small businesses are created and grow to service the influx of new employees. New lease sales for gas drilling mean revenue is pouring into state coffers at an unexpected pace. Jobs are being created at a rate that would make many other parts of the country envious.

The Intelligencer: Hysteria Distorts Debate Over Gas: New Yorkers use vast amounts of both natural gas and oil, of course. We assume Lifton travels in motor vehicles that use gasoline. Where, pray tell, does she suppose the fuel can be obtained if not from wells? New York's moratorium has benefited our area, as many local residents know. That has not gone unnoticed in the Empire State, where an oil and gas industry official noted this week, "Nearly three years has gone by since the state essentially halted the permitting of natural gas drilling" in southern New York. "During that time," he added, "we have watched people, jobs, businesses and opportunity flee our state for Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia, where those economies are rebounding strongly as a result of increased natural gas development."

Additional Resources:

The Examiner: New York - and America - Can Profit from 'Fracking' Marcellus Shale

Bloomberg: Oil Drillers Say Changing Rules Stymie Exploration

Billings Gazette: Interior Order Would Block Beneficial Bighorn Basin

RealVail.com: Despite Skyrocketing Gas Prices, Oil Shale Remains Long-Term Energy Prospect on Colorado's Western Slope

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Rayola Dougher is senior economist at The American Petroleum Institute (API), where she analyzes information, manages projects and develops briefing materials on energy markets and oil industry policy issues. She is the author or co-author of economic research studies covering a diverse range of topics including crude oil and petroleum product markets, gasoline taxes, energy conservation and competition in retail markets. In addition to testifying before federal and state legislators, she has participated in numerous newspaper, radio and television interviews on a wide range of issues affecting the oil industry, including crude oil and gasoline prices, industry taxes and earnings, exploration and production, and refining and marketing topics.

Prior to joining API, Rayola worked at the Institute for Energy Analysis where her research focused on carbon dioxide related issues and international energy demand and supply forecasts. Rayola holds a Masters degree in Economic Development and East Asian studies from the American University and a degree in History and Political Science from the State University of New York at Brockport.