The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Speak Out About Energy Issues

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted October 27, 2010

With just a few days to go before one of the most highly-contested mid-term elections in U.S. history, Americans are taking a hard look at the candidates and the issues before heading to the polls. Whether they are Republicans, Democrats or Independents, voters recognize the election's importance in framing fiscal policy, as well as energy and environmental issues for the next two years.

Numerous energy and environmental issues are likely to be affected by the election results. They include such controversial policies as the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed greenhouse gas (GHG) regulations and the ongoing debate over domestic oil and natural gas production. Each is important to the nation's future and to the well being of every American family.

We'd like to know which of the following issues are most important to you.

Pick one from the list below and tell us why you think it's important. You can also let us know what you think Congress should do about those issues or ask us questions as they relate to energy, using the comments section below this post to list your thoughts.

(a) U.S. energy production vs. imported oil

(b) Energy taxes

(c) Offshore energy development

(d) Alternative fuels and renewable energy

(e) Shale gas production

(f) All of the above

(g) None of the above (submit your own).

Tell us what you think. We'll highlight some of the responses and answer your questions in an upcoming blog post.

And for more information about the candidates and elections in your state, read through the API voter guide.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jane Van Ryan was formerly senior communications manager and new media advisor at the American Petroleum Institute (API), where she wrote blog posts and produced podcasts and videos. Before coming to API, Jane managed communications for a large science and engineering corporation, and for a top-tier research and engineering university. A few years ago, you might have seen her in your living room when she delivered the news on television. Jane officially retired from API in 2011 and now freelances as an independent communications consultant when not gardening at her farm in Virginia.