The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Individuals Speak Out at Virtual Rally

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted September 29, 2010

Thus far, nearly 170,000 Americans have participated in the Virtual Rally for Jobs. In fact, the online rally has been such a success that it's been extended through the rest of this week (until Friday, October 1).

Among the thousands of rally participants are leaders of various organizations whose members depend on reliable and affordable energy--and many whose jobs are supported by the oil and natural gas industry. In the videos below, they have stepped forward to encourage Americans to get involved.

Karen Kerrigan is president and CEO of the Small Business & Entrepreneurship Council, an organization representing roughly 70,000 members. Karen joined the Virtual Rally for Jobs because of the energy industry's importance to America's small business and entrepreneurial sector.

Harry C. Alford is president and CEO of the National Black Chamber of Commerce (NBCC) which supports 1.9 million African American firms--the fastest growing segment of the U.S. business world. Harry encourages Americans to join the virtual rally and remind policymakers that it's about "jobs, jobs and jobs!"

The American Highway Users Alliance (AHUA) and its president Greg Cohen represent motoring clubs, truckers, bus companies, drivers of recreational vehicles and motorcyclists--pretty much everyone out there on the roads--who rely on affordable transportation fuels.

These individuals and the thousands of other participants have a stake in our nation's energy policies--whether it's keeping a job, growing a business, controlling household energy costs, improving our nation's security or protecting the environment. Energy is vital to our nation's economic growth, to the American way of life and to quality American jobs.

Visit www.rallyforjobs.org to learn more and participate.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jane Van Ryan was formerly senior communications manager and new media advisor at the American Petroleum Institute (API), where she wrote blog posts and produced podcasts and videos. Before coming to API, Jane managed communications for a large science and engineering corporation, and for a top-tier research and engineering university. A few years ago, you might have seen her in your living room when she delivered the news on television. Jane officially retired from API in 2011 and now freelances as an independent communications consultant when not gardening at her farm in Virginia.