The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

North Dakota Oil Production = Breaking Records

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted July 16, 2010

After months of mixed economic news and 9-10 percent unemployment, it's heartening to read about areas of the country that seem to be doing well.

As we pointed out last week, North Dakota's record oil production for 2009 and its ongoing "oil boom" has had a very positive impact on the state's economy, revenue and jobs.

Recently, North Dakota Petroleum Council (NDPC) president Ron Ness said he expected 2010 North Dakota oil production "to be way off the chart."

He was right.

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Carpe Diem blogger Mark Perry highlights the state's record monthly oil production for May 2010 in a blog post from this week. Mark says:

"Total Monthly Production: 9,189,101 barrels in May, the first time that monthly production topped 9 million barrels. Amazingly, oil production in North Dakota has doubled in just the last two years."

North Dakota's energy production is making an important contribution to U.S. energy security. Government forecasts project the United States will continue to need oil and natural gas in the decades to come. And it just makes sense to produce it here rather than to import it from other nations.

For information about the oil industry and North Dakota, take a look at the "Oil Can" Program, designed to share information and improve understanding between North Dakota's petroleum industry and the community.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jane Van Ryan was formerly senior communications manager and new media advisor at the American Petroleum Institute (API), where she wrote blog posts and produced podcasts and videos. Before coming to API, Jane managed communications for a large science and engineering corporation, and for a top-tier research and engineering university. A few years ago, you might have seen her in your living room when she delivered the news on television. Jane officially retired from API in 2011 and now freelances as an independent communications consultant when not gardening at her farm in Virginia.