The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Offshore Drilling Decision Expected Soon

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted March 29, 2010

Within the next few days, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar is expected to announce his decision on America's offshore leasing program. In case you haven't been following this story closely, here's some background information.

  • Sec. Salazar has told reporters that he's likely to announce the 2007-2012 plan re-evaluation at the same time he releases details of the upcoming 2012-2017 offshore drilling plan. According to reports, he plans to roll some sales included in the current plan into the 2012-2017 leasing program, which could delay several lease sales until after the 2012 presidential election.

During the past few days, members of Congress have penned letters stating their positions on offshore energy development. In mid-March, 88 Republican House members sent a letter to Sec. Salazar urging him to end the de facto "Obama Moratorium" on offshore leasing.

The letter says 68 percent of Americans support offshore energy development, adding, "It should be the policy of the Administration to execute the will of Congress and the American people."

Taking the opposing view, 10 Democrat Senators are pushing for restrictions on offshore drilling. In a letter to the three U.S. senators who are working on climate legislation, they also said they do not support the sharing of offshore leasing revenue with the states. (Platts)

The economic importance of Sec. Salazar's upcoming decision cannot be overstated.

If he moves forward with offshore drilling, the oil and natural gas industry will be able to make investments that could create thousands of jobs, raise money for the federal, state, and local governments and help the economy grow. If he delays offshore development, the administration will miss the opportunity to put people back to work.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jane Van Ryan was formerly senior communications manager and new media advisor at the American Petroleum Institute (API), where she wrote blog posts and produced podcasts and videos. Before coming to API, Jane managed communications for a large science and engineering corporation, and for a top-tier research and engineering university. A few years ago, you might have seen her in your living room when she delivered the news on television. Jane officially retired from API in 2011 and now freelances as an independent communications consultant when not gardening at her farm in Virginia.