The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Florida Offshore Drilling: Providing Jobs and Preserving the Environment

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted March 24, 2010

In a Tallahassee Democrat op-ed published this week, the Florida Petroleum Council's Dave Mica challenges recent inaccurate claims that oil and natural gas jobs are declining and production off Florida's coast will harm the tourism industry.

Dave argues that the oil and natural gas industry already supports 9.2 million American jobs and is poised to create even more jobs if provided more opportunities to explore and produce domestic oil and natural gas.

Further, energy development doesn't have to come at a price to the environment. Dave says:

"The good news is that Florida does not have to choose between offshore oil and natural gas development and tourism and the environment. State-of-the-art advances in seismic measurements, directional drilling, subsea production and safety systems, along with cooperative planning among industry, governments, local communities and environmental stakeholders, have led to incredibly creative and responsible approaches for reaching oil and natural gas resources in unique areas."

Dave cites a few examples of oil and natural facilities where energy development and the environment are in harmony, including Independence Hub south of Pensacola in the Gulf of Mexico. A one-acre surface platform manages 10 natural gas fields on the ocean floor, extending about 40 miles from the platform.

Independence Hub.jpg

(Independence Hub)

Dave explains:

"...technology has expanded the possibilities for meeting the unique challenges of Florida's special environment and military commitments in new ways. And the industry continues to innovate to meet new challenges."

Domestic oil and natural gas can provide new jobs, revenues and energy for the nation's economy. For more information, read the full op-ed.

{Image source: AP}

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jane Van Ryan was formerly senior communications manager and new media advisor at the American Petroleum Institute (API), where she wrote blog posts and produced podcasts and videos. Before coming to API, Jane managed communications for a large science and engineering corporation, and for a top-tier research and engineering university. A few years ago, you might have seen her in your living room when she delivered the news on television. Jane officially retired from API in 2011 and now freelances as an independent communications consultant when not gardening at her farm in Virginia.