The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Murkowski Says EPA GHG Regulations Are an "Economic Train Wreck"

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted January 22, 2010

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) yesterday introduced a bipartisan disapproval resolution to prevent the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from regulating greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) under the Clean Air Act.

Calling the proposed regulations an "economic train wreck," she told the Senate:

"...I continue to believe that this command-and-control approach is our worst option for reducing the emissions blamed for climate change. The Clean Air Act was written for Congress to regulate criteria pollutants, not greenhouse gases, and its implementation remains subject to oversight and guidance from elected representatives."

Murkowski said EPA's GHG regulations could close businesses, lay off workers, restrict U.S. energy production, make housing less affordable and raise the price of consumer goods. The resolution was co-sponsored by 35 Republicans and three Democrats.

As we reported yesterday, EPA's GHG regulations also could create a conundrum for states that have their own GHG regulations containing provisions that conflict with EPA's proposed regulations. Several states are seeking to delay the new regulations.

"...There will be severe consequences,"Murkowski warned in her floor speech."...Why would the EPA want to pursue these regulations right now, when we should be focused on getting our economy back on track?"

She added that several groups strongly oppose the EPA regulations, including the American Farm Bureau Federation, the National Taxpayers Union, and the Small Business Administration's Office of Advocacy.

EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson responded by saying the disapproval resolution "asks each senator to deny the overwhelming science that greenhouse gas pollution is a real and serious threat to the health and welfare of our citizens." (The Washington Post)

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jane Van Ryan was formerly senior communications manager and new media advisor at the American Petroleum Institute (API), where she wrote blog posts and produced podcasts and videos. Before coming to API, Jane managed communications for a large science and engineering corporation, and for a top-tier research and engineering university. A few years ago, you might have seen her in your living room when she delivered the news on television. Jane officially retired from API in 2011 and now freelances as an independent communications consultant when not gardening at her farm in Virginia.