The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

New Year's Resolution: Get Smart on Energy with College of Knowledge

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted January 6, 2010

As we begin a New Year, many of us think about New Year's resolutions. Some people want to find more time to exercise amid busy schedules, while others hope to learn more about a particular topic that interests them.

If you're interested in learning more about issues affecting you--particularly energy issues--you're in luck. Today, we're launching our newest interactive, College of Knowledge, where YOU are the student.

In this game, you can learn more about energy and show off your knowledge by answering questions about energy economics, security, efficiency and innovation.

To earn your degree from the College of Knowledge, you have to answer questions such as:

  • What U.S. state produces the most crude oil?
  • What is the term for sensitive electronic sensors that can detect the smell of hydrocarbons?

So pick a course and answer the questions correctly to earn your College of Knowledge degree. And once you pass a certain course, you can grab a blog badge and post it to your blog or Website, letting others know how you did. You also can forward the game along to friends.

As Congress considers energy legislation that could affect all American families and businesses, what better New Year's resolution than learning the facts about energy versus the political rhetoric?

For additional games and simulations to test your skills and knowledge of the energy industry, visit the Energy Arcade.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jane Van Ryan was formerly senior communications manager and new media advisor at the American Petroleum Institute (API), where she wrote blog posts and produced podcasts and videos. Before coming to API, Jane managed communications for a large science and engineering corporation, and for a top-tier research and engineering university. A few years ago, you might have seen her in your living room when she delivered the news on television. Jane officially retired from API in 2011 and now freelances as an independent communications consultant when not gardening at her farm in Virginia.