The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Oil and Natural Gas Jobs in Your State

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted December 9, 2009

As we've discussed on this blog, America's oil and natural gas industry supports more than 9 million jobs in every U.S. state--and one of them may be yours.

To see the industry's jobs impact in your state, explore API's interactive map.

USA jobs map

For example, you'll find that in Pennsylvania alone, 271,250 jobs are supported by the industry. These jobs add $25.8 billion to the gross state product, or 4.8% of its wealth.

These jobs are not just in exploring, producing, refining, transporting and marketing oil and natural gas, but also through the purchases of other goods and services that support the industry's operations. Equipment suppliers, construction companies, management specialists, and food service businesses are all a strong link to the industry. These businesses, in turn, purchase other goods and services that support other jobs throughout Pennsylvania and the nation.

And even if you're not one of the millions employed by one of our companies, every individual is somehow touched by America's oil and natural gas industry.

Farmers use fertilizer made from natural gas. Truckers use diesel fuel to ship goods to market. And businesses rely on oil and natural gas to make and sell their products and provide their services. If you buy a loaf of bread, purchase a new electronic gadget, or drive a car, consider yourself a part of the oil and natural gas industry.

So it's hard-working Americans who have the most to lose if Congress impedes America's oil and natural gas industry. Stand up for jobs, your state and America, and tell your elected officials in Congress that by putting America's energy resources to work, they are helping to create thousands of well-paying jobs across the country.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jane Van Ryan was formerly senior communications manager and new media advisor at the American Petroleum Institute (API), where she wrote blog posts and produced podcasts and videos. Before coming to API, Jane managed communications for a large science and engineering corporation, and for a top-tier research and engineering university. A few years ago, you might have seen her in your living room when she delivered the news on television. Jane officially retired from API in 2011 and now freelances as an independent communications consultant when not gardening at her farm in Virginia.