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offshore-energy  offshore-platform  oil-and-natural-gas  gulf-of-mexico 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 25, 2016

Heidelberg and other offshore production facilities are integral to U.S. energy security. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates Gulf production will average 1.63 million barrels of oil per day (mb/d) this year and reach 1.91 mb/d by December next year, accounting for 18 percent and 21 percent of total U.S. crude oil production in 2016 and 2017, respectively.

Output from Heidelberg and other platforms reflects decisions made years ago – to buy leases and to invest in exploration and development. That’s why it’s critically important for robust planning now, starting with the government’s 2017-2022 offshore oil and natural gas leasing program that’s currently being put together by federal officials.

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oil-and-natural-gas  climate  emission-reductions  us-energy-security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 24, 2016

Compelling video interview earlier this month with Chevron Chairman and CEO John S. Watson by the Wall Street Journal – headlined the “Morality of Oil.”

This is especially timely, given the claims of some industry opponents that affordable, reliable, portable energy somehow isn’t a public good, despite some important facts to the contrary.

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oil-and-natural-gas-production  security  energy-exports  economic-growth  climate 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 23, 2016

New figures from the U.S. Energy Information Administration show the United States remained the world’s No. 1 producer of oil and natural gas in 2015, a position the U.S. has held since 2012.

Several important points here, supporting the idea that U.S. world energy leadership is a big thing.

First, U.S. production of oil and natural gas grew last year despite continued low prices for crude last year. U.S. output of petroleum and other liquid fuels grew from 14.08 million barrels per day in 2014 to 15.04 million barrels per day in 2015. According to EIA, natural gas production rose from 74.89 billion cubic feet per day (bcf/d) in 2014 to 78.94 bcf/d in 2015, or about 13.99 million barrels of oil equivalent per day.

The second point is the vast majority of U.S. energy production is the result of safe and responsible hydraulic fracturing and modern horizontal drilling – fracking.

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offshore-development  oil-and-natural-gas  safe-operations  alaska  arctic  boem 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 20, 2016

Near year’s end the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) is scheduled to release its offshore oil and natural gas leasing program for 2017-2022.

For more than a year BOEM has methodically worked to craft a program that will blueprint offshore development into the next decade and beyond, developing drafts, receiving comments from the public as well as inputs from elected officials in affected states.

With the United States emerging as the world’s leading producer of oil and natural gas, planning America’s offshore oil and gas development has never been more important. The United States must have an offshore oil and natural gas program that reflects America’s energy superpower status.

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everything  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 19, 2016

It’s a fundamental question before most, if not all, of the 2.83 million graduates (associate’s and bachelor’s) in the college Class of 2016: What do you want to be?

More to the point: Where do your interests lie, how might what you learned in college be applied and where might career opportunity be found?

Think energy. Here’s why: The U.S. – and the world – will always need energy.

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renewable-fuel-standard  rfs34  consumer-protection  epa34  ethanol  e1534  blend-wall 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 18, 2016

One unsettling aspect of the federal Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) is that for some time it has appeared – from public statements anyway – that EPA considers the program an ongoing experiment, testing the ability of government policy to change or modify the behavior of free markets and the fueling choices of individual consumers, with consumers as the guinea pigs.

The results were logged in long ago: Flaws in the RFS and EPA’s management of the program mark it for repeal or significant reform. RFS mandates for increasing ethanol use in the nation’s fuel supply threaten breaching the ethanol “blend wall,” risking impacts to the broader economy and consumers’ wallets.

Just as unfortunate is EPA’s apparent lack of concern for U.S. consumers –reflected in the agency’s proposals for 2017 volume levels, which will test the blend wall, the point where required use of ethanol in the fuel supply exceeds the safe level of 10 percent.


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jobs  infrastructure  natural-gas-pipelines  investment  economic-growth 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted May 18, 2016

The average American household has saved almost $750 in annual energy costs compared to 2008, according to recent data released by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Greater availability of domestic oil and natural gas, made possible by hydraulic fracturing, has helped drive down prices for gasoline, electricity and home heating.

Keeping affordable, reliable energy moving to families and businesses requires infrastructure -- pipelines, storage, processing, rail and maritime resources. Candidates often make infrastructure development a centerpiece of their economic plans, promising to create jobs and modernize the U.S. transportation system by improving roads, bridges, rail networks and airports. Energy infrastructure should be on that list. Shovel-ready projects abound in the energy sector.

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oil-and-natural-gas-production  security  economic-growth  energy-exports  climate  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 17, 2016

The United States in 2040 will be more energy self-sufficient, a net energy exporter and a lower source of energy-related carbon emissions as clean-burning natural gas becomes the dominant fuel for generating electricity. The leading energy source 24 years into the future – as they are now – will be oil and natural gas.  

So projects the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) in an early look at select data from EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2016 report that’s scheduled for full release in July.

The main takeaway from EIA’s “sneak preview” is the importance of the U.S. energy revolution – primarily oil and natural gas developed from shale and other tight-rock formations using safe hydraulic fracturing and modern horizontal drilling. The United States is stronger now and will be in the future thanks to domestic energy from fracking.

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infrastructure  natural-gas-pipelines  economic-growth  jobs  climate  labor-unions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 16, 2016

We kick off “Infrastructure Week 2016,” a seven-day focus on America’s infrastructure needs, sponsored by more than 100 trade associations and business and labor groups, with a conversation API President and CEO Jack Gerard and Sean McGarvey, president of North America’s Building Trades Unions, had last week with reporters covering a range of infrastructure and energy policy issues. Highlights below.

Gerard and McGarvey framed the infrastructure discussion by pointing out the way new pipelines, pipeline expansions and other projects are needed to harness America’s energy revolution and spread the benefits of the new energy abundance – to consumersworkers, businesses and to the betterment of the environment – to all parts of the country.

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natural-gas-production  epa-regulation  methane  emssions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 12, 2016

We’ll say it again: Methane emissions are falling. And they’ll continue doing so because industry wants to capture as much of the primary component of natural gas as possible, for delivery to consumers.

So that’s the context for EPA’s regulatory initiative. Basically, the agency looked at the energy landscape – one of surging production but also declining emissions – and determined the next step should be more regulation. The resulting new rules could hinder America’s shale energy revolution, one that has helped lower U.S. energy-related carbon emissions 12 percent below 2005 levels, allowing the United States to lead the world in reducing carbon emissions.

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