The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

education  energy-101  science  us-energy  vote4energy  everything 

Kate Wallace

Kate Wallace
Posted August 4, 2016

Part of industry’s commitment to the country and its future growth and prosperity is supporting the educational needs of the next-generation workforce that will bring that future to life.

With experts saying much of that growth and prosperity – as well as the accompanying careers – will be built on a foundation of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education, a major part of industry’s outreach is focused on developing students’ interest in these topics as early as possible. 

Read More

analysis  ozone-standards  epa34  regulation  air-quality  science  economic-impacts  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 27, 2015

With national ozone levels falling, some activists argue for stricter federal standards the best way they can – by pointing to the relatively few areas in the United States where ozone levels remain above the current standard of 75 parts per billion (ppb).

Yet, think about that. If an urban area like Los Angeles or Houston currently is out of attainment with the standard set at 75 ppb, how will lowering the national standard to 65 or 60 ppb – which EPA is considering – make a difference in those and other non-compliant areas? Good question.

The fact remains that the current standards are working. EPA data shows ozone levels declined 18 percent between 2008 and 2013.

Read More

epa34  keystone-xl-pipeline  politics  science  oil-markets  renewable-fuel-standard 

Bob Greco

Bob Greco
Posted February 5, 2015

Two of the Environmental Protection Agency’s seven statements of purpose reference “best available scientific information” and “accurate information.”  These also happen to be two things that many in Washington, D.C., feel that EPA is setting aside in the pursuit of political goals.  Yesterday the agency released comments on the Keystone XL pipeline that gave plenty of credence to its critics.

It is somewhat of a shame, because EPA’s comments did make many good points.  It acknowledged the comprehensiveness of the State Departments review of the project, the usefulness of mitigation measures the project will take to reduce environmental impact and the reduction of risks associated with spills and leaks from the pipeline.  And then we begin to drift from accurate information into political calculation. 

Read More

oil-and-natural-gas-jobs  education  science  technology  engineers  energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 25, 2014

A couple of the main points in API President and CEO Jack Gerard’s speech to the STEM Solutions National Leadership Conference in Washington this week:

  • America’s oil and natural gas industry offers the careers to attract motivated science, technology, engineering and math graduates – and it needs them.
  • Industry’s dynamic job-creating ability must be sustained through strategies and policies that allow it to continue to be a global energy leader.

Kudos to U.S. News & World Report for hosting the conference that attracted so many bright young people – including one of the youngest people to visit the North and South Pole and a teen-ager who developed an early detection test for pancreatic cancer. Gerard used the opportunity to underscore the oil and natural gas industry’s need for science and technology workers.

Read More

economy  science  engineers  hydraulic-fracturing  keystone-xl  manufacturing 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted June 19, 2013

Free Enterprise Energizing Manufacturing

Current North American energy abundance is the result of innovation and private-sector investment, writes FE. “Government policies that restrict development or prevent the market from working effectively may reduce the benefits this energy competitive advantage offers to Americans and to our manufacturing industries.”

Project SyndicateFrack to the Future

Harvard professor and former Clinton administration economic advisor Jeffrey Frankel argues the environmental benefits of increased natural gas use, noting that “one can virtually prove that shale gas is the major factor behind the fall in US emissions.”

Read More