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Energy Tomorrow Blog

oil-and-natural-gas  access  offshore-energy  onshore-development  leasing-plan 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 22, 2016

It’s clear in a new Harris Poll on energy issues that Americans recognize the revolutionary opportunity that’s being afforded the United States by increased domestic energy production – consumer benefits, economic growth and increased security.

The poll’s registered voters see a new U.S. energy narrative, one of abundance that’s making America more self-reliant and stronger. Even more, those surveyed appreciate the fact that American-made energy is a path to future prosperity, and they want policies that help ensure that path is taken.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  access  regulation  offshore-energy  onshore-development  economic-growth  emission-reductions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 4, 2016

With the president scheduled to put forward his last budget next week, here’s a short list of principles that should guide energy policy – because all will help sustain and grow the ongoing U.S. energy revolution. They include: reliance on industry innovation that has been the driving force behind America’s energy renaissance – innovation that launched the surge in shale energy production, prompting increased natural gas use and resulting in lower carbon emissions; embracing the successful, free-market approach to energy and economic growth while lowering emissions by basing decisions on sound science; and allowing more opportunities for energy exploration and development.

Erik Milito, API’s director of upstream and industry operations, talked about the policy pathway to energy growth and American prosperity during a conference call with reporters.

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oil-and-natural-gas-production  domestic-energy-access  eia34  offshore-energy  onshore-development  shale-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 6, 2015

Statistics in the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s Monthly Energy Review for March show U.S. domestic energy production meeting about 89 percent of the country’s total energy demand. That’s up from 84 percent in 2013 and 2012 and reflects a key result of the domestic energy revolution: growing U.S. self-sufficiency.

EIA data shows U.S. energy production as a percentage of total demand. Total energy production (fossil fuels, nuclear electric power and renewables – again, as a percentage of total U.S. energy demand -- was about 69 percent in 2005, and it grew to about 89 percent last year. The share of fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal) accounted for approximately 55 percent in 2005, growing to about 70 percent last year.


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energy-policies  oil-and-natural-gas-development  louisiana  louisiana-oil-gas-association  economic-growth  offshore-development  onshore-development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 11, 2014

Interesting energy discussion this week from New Orleans at a town hall event hosted by The Atlantic – where the focus was on infrastructure, jobs and economic growth, and the need for sensible, bipartisan energy policymaking.

There was no better place for such a conversation and certainly no better time – with our ongoing domestic energy revolution lifting the United States to global energy superpower status: No. 1 in natural gas production and expected to be No. 1 in oil production next year. This development is helping drive the economy forward, creating jobs, opportunity and greater U.S. energy security. Indeed, energy’s national economic impact is seen in a new survey of the 30,000 businesses, in every state and the District of Columbia, that support domestic energy development.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  domestic-access  exports  russia  offshore-development  onshore-development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 30, 2014

The quest to encourage better behavior from Russia continues. President Obama and the European Union this week announced new sanctions to protest Russia’s involvement in Ukraine, measures that focus on Russia’s energy, arms and finance sectors. The president:

“Today … the United States is imposing new sanctions in key sectors of the Russian economy:  energy, arms, and finance.  We’re blocking the exports of specific goods and technologies to the Russian energy sector.  We’re expanding our sanctions to more Russian banks and defense companies.  And we’re formally suspending credit that encourages exports to Russia and financing for economic development projects in Russia. At the same time, the European Union is joining us in imposing major sanctions on Russia – its most significant and wide-ranging sanctions to date.”

Meanwhile, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says Europe needs to stand up to Russia, which will be easier to do if Europe diversifies its energy supplies:

“They need to understand they must stand up to [Russian President] Vladimir Putin. The reluctance has to do with European dependence on energy from Russia.”

Laudable sentiments and goals, but America can do more than impose targeted and inherently limited sanctions. The U.S. can do more than talk. America can do more to provide effective help for her friends and to diminish the influence of adversaries. Through energy, American energy.

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