The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

oklahoma  vote4energy  oil-and-natural-gas  us-energy-security  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 29, 2016

As the United States’ fifth-ranked state in total energy production, Oklahoma has virtually the entire package: oil and natural gas (both top-five in output nationally), the sprawling oil pipeline and storage hub at Cushing, refineries and renewable energy – found in all that wind that comes sweepin’ down the plain, of course.

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analysis  oklahoma  biofuels  e1534  energy  ethanol  gasoline-prices  pricewaterhousecoopers  renewable-fuel-standard  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 20, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Oklahoma. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and reviewed Hawaii, Idaho and Vermont this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Oklahoma, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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news  liquefied-natural-gas  lng-exports  crude-oil  oklahoma  shale-energy  pennsylvania  renewable-fuel-standard  ethanol 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 1, 2015

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette op-ed (Eberhart): ... Since 2000, global LNG demand has grown an estimated 7.6 percent per year. And that rate is expected to increase: Ernst & Young predicts that by 2030 global demand will reach 500 million metric tons, doubling 2012 levels.

At the same time, because of the surge of natural gas from American shale, the United States is awash in the stuff, with domestic natural gas production increasing 41 percent in the past decade alone.

Ten years ago we were an LNG importer. Today we’re the world’s largest natural gas producer.

And with the amount of technically recoverable natural gas in the United States 100 times greater than our current consumption, we have a boon to the economy that is expected to contribute up to 665,000 net jobs and $115 billion to GDP by 2035. We are expected to have enough gas to meet our own needs while also helping to satisfy staggering demand in places like Japan, Korea, India, China and Taiwan.

Clearly, this is an opportunity we don’t want to miss. But a protracted, redundant and expensive approval process could put it just out of reach.

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american-energy  fracking  jobs  economy  environment  texas  colorado  oklahoma  manufacturing 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted July 25, 2014

The Southern: In three years of working in the fracking fields of North Dakota, Rick Tippett has witnessed two accidents, he said.

Tippett, 61, of Creal Springs, said he never feels he puts his safety at risk when on a horizontal fracking site. Tippett works six weeks straight and returns to his Southern Illinois home during his 10-day breaks.

Between two weeks of orientation focused solely on safety, provided by a multitude of gas companies and regulators; yearly safety training and company-provided protective gear, Tippett said safety is “the No. 1 priority” on a job site.

Tippett spoke with The Southern Illinoisan after statements from Southern Illinoisans Against Fracturing Our Environment issued Wednesday that fracking is unsafe for workers. The SAFE comments came a day after fracking proponents urged faster movement on drafting rules to regulate horizontal fracking.

Accidents he has seen involved one friend who hurt his hand from a fallen pipe and another who was uninjured when water used for fracking splashed on him.

In the second incident, emergency crews responded and washed the man down as a precaution, Tippett said.

“They will stop all work if anything happens,” he said of companies operating the fracking sites.

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american-energy  energy-security  economy  jobs  fracking  texas  oklahoma  pennsylvania 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 31, 2014

Over the past few years, the U.S. has witnessed a dramatic turnaround in its energy situation. Thanks largely to a combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," energy producers have been able to tap vast oil and gas deposits buried in deep shale formations. As a result, domestic oil and gas production has surged to multi-decade highs.

This energy boom has yielded tremendous and widespread economic benefits to the United States. A statement from the White House Council of Economic Advisors last year summed it up nicely: "Every barrel of oil or cubic foot of gas that we produce at home instead of importing abroad means more jobs, faster growth, and a lower trade deficit." Let's take a closer look at some of the main ways the energy boom has helped the nation's economy.

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canada  domestic-energy  keystone-xl-pipeline  nebraska  oil-pipeline  oil-sands  oklahoma  refinery  transcanada  alberta 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted October 26, 2010

In today's episode, I interview Dan Gunderson, a consultant to API, who describes the benefits of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, which would carry oil-sands derived crude oil from Canada to markets in Oklahoma and refineries along the Gulf Coast.

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alaska  domestic-energy  energy-development  north-dakota  ok234  oklahoma  pennsylvania  texas  west-virginia  energy-producing-states  gallup  gallup-poll  gallup-poll-on-energy  lousiana 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted July 26, 2010

As we've mentioned on this blog many times, energy development is a primary driver of job creation. Developing the nation's abundant oil and natural gas resources could create tens of thousands of additional jobs. 

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