The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

lng-exports  natural-gas-benefits  economic-growth  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 13, 2018

The U.S. Energy Department’s latest study on the economic impacts of exporting liquefied natural gas (LNG) reaches a by-now familiar top-line conclusion: Exporting U.S. LNG is good for the economy, and those benefits will outweigh domestic cost impacts.

We say familiar, because this is the fifth DOE study on LNG exports – and the fifth to describe broad, positive economic impacts for the United States from shipping natural gas to friends and allies overseas – which should end claims that LNG exports could harm American consumers.

Certainly, no one can say the issue hasn’t been thoroughly analyzed – not after five government studies and two commissioned by our industry (see here and here).

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natural-gas-benefits  consumers  emission-reductions  air-quality 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted April 25, 2018

There are plenty of statistics out there to measure the scope of U.S. natural gas production. The United States is the No. 1 natural gas producer in the world, producing 78.9 billion cubic feet per day in 2017. Exports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) nearly quadrupled in 2017, making the U.S. a net natural gas exporter for the first time in nearly 60 years and supporting hundreds of thousands of jobs across the nation. 

The numbers are impressive, but the economic and climate benefits they make possible are even more remarkable. In a new series of short videos, we’ve boiled down the natural gas advantage into five words.


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natural-gas-benefits  emission-reductions  consumers  renewable-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 15, 2018

By now I hope you’ve seen API’s new national TV ad that is air during NCAA basketball tournament games, touting the benefits of U.S. natural gas. The ad’s message is as clear as America’s air: Thanks to increasing use of clean, affordable natural gas, U.S. emissions of carbon dioxide from electricity generation – a major source of the greenhouse gas – are at their lowest level in 25 years. That’s an amazing development for a couple reasons.


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natural-gas-benefits  consumers  natural-gas-supplies  nuclear  subsidies 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 26, 2017

We support all-of-the-above energy – the concept that America is strongest and its citizens are best served when all of our country’s energy sources play their part. We’re also for the important role markets play in determining energy sources, because markets reward innovation, spur efficiency, lower prices and work to benefit consumers. That said, a new study that basically argues market-distorting subsidies enjoyed by some energies should be followed by market-distorting subsidies for others makes little sense.

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natural-gas-pipelines  environmental-review  consumers  natural-gas-benefits  natural-gas-access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 21, 2017

For a number of months we’ve been talking about the need for more efficient and predictable federal processes for the permitting of energy infrastructure – including new natural gas pipelines and added capacity. New, bipartisan legislation introduced this week in the U.S. Senate is latest move in that direction.

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natural-gas-benefits  new-jersey  consumers  nuclear 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 19, 2017

Looking at the benefits of natural gas in a state such as New Jersey – lower consumer costs, jobs, environmental progress – it makes no sense to risk what works for New Jerseyans by handing state subsidies to nuclear plants. New Jersey voters agree: A strong, bipartisan majority opposes the idea in a new poll.

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natural-gas  natural-gas-benefits  natural-gas-jobs  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 19, 2017

API has a new group director for Market Development – former Ohio Public Utilities Commissioner Todd Snitchler. He heads a team that is focused on increasing market opportunities for abundant natural gas, which is benefiting consumers and manufacturers while advancing U.S. climate goals. In addition to serving as Ohio PUC chairman and chairing the Power Siting Board of Ohio, Snitchler was elected twice to the state’s House of Representatives.

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natural-gas-benefits  emission-reductions  economic-growth  international-energy-agency  carbon-dioxide-emissions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 11, 2016

Two questions posed by the Times: How to explain a departure from the historical linkage between economic growth and increased carbon emissions? And, can the decoupling of economic growth and rising emissions be a model for the rest of the world?

The explanation isn’t all that complicated. We’ve talked about it for a number of months (see here and here). It’s natural gas. The increased use of clean-burning, domestically produced natural gas is the main reason the United States leading the world in reducing carbon emissions during a period of economic growth. 


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natural-gas-benefits  emission-reductions  carbon-dioxide  shale-energy  marcellus-shale-region 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 22, 2016

We’ve read the articles about how affordable natural gas – much of it from the Marcellus Shale in next-door Pennsylvania – has benefitted New York and specifically New York City. So it’s puzzling to hear about a recent effort in New York to block expansion of an Upstate natural gas storage plant in the name of a “climate emergency,” as one activist put it – puzzling because natural gas is doing more to reduce U.S. emissions than any other fuel. The New York Times reports:

“The irony is this,” said Phil West, a spokesman for Spectra Energy, whose pipeline projects, including those in New York State, have come under attack. “The shift to additional natural gas use is a key contributor to helping the U.S. reduce energy-related emissions and improve air quality.”

Unfortunately, this is an example of out-of-the-mainstream activism at work, threatening to roll back important American progress on emissions that has occurred during a period of economic growth and rising domestic energy output. We say this is out of the mainstream because we reckon the real alarm would sound among New Yorkers if access to affordable natural gas got harder for lack of infrastructure – pipelines, pumping stations, storage installations and the like.

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natural-gas-benefits  co2-emissions  emission-reductions  us-energy-security  economic-benefits  renewable-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 4, 2016

Just recently saw this article on National Geographic.com, suggesting the United States made a significant shift in its energy economy in 2015:

Consider what happened last year alone. The amount of electricity from coal-fired power plants hit a record low while that from natural gas generators hit a record high. Also, renewable energy added the most new power to the electric grid, and annual carbon emissions reached a 20-year low.

First, a reminder that new power capacity added to the grid doesn’t translate directly to new power. Below, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) data shows that in terms of electricity generation change (from 2014 to 2015) at utility-scale facilities and including distributed solar, natural gas led in net generation:  

That’s not knocking renewables, just an illustration of today’s energy reality and a reminder of the oft-overlooked energy, economic and climate benefits accruing to the United States from increasing natural gas use.

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