The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

gasoline-prices  crude-oil  gasoline-blends  gasoline-taxes  consumers 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted May 31, 2018

In a recently released report, the U.N. Conference on Trade and Development digs into the factors that have made the U.S. energy dominance possible, and – specifically – the role of natural gas in energy dominance. 

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gasoline-prices  crude-oil  gasoline-blends  gasoline-taxes  consumers 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 24, 2018

Let’s add some needed perspective in the ongoing discussion of U.S. gasoline prices – even as Washington politicians try to exploit them for their own agendas. The latest political play: Senate Democrats want the president to cajole other nations into producing more oil to increase supply in hopes of moderating things at the pump.

Certainly, increasing global crude supply is important, because in the past doing so has put downward pressure on the cost of crude, the No. 1 factor driving gasoline prices.

But, since we’ve seen how much lower and less volatile prices have been the past four years, thanks to the growth of U.S. oil production, wouldn’t it be smarter to encourage greater oil production here at home? Senate Energy Committee Chairwoman Lisa Murkowski

thinks so.

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crude-oil  oil-markets 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted March 15, 2018

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently noted that for the first time in since 2008, S&P 500 Index’s implied volatility briefly surpassed that of crude oil in February. In this context, “volatility” is a measure of the rate and magnitude of variations in prices. EIA’s observation could be important if it suggests stock prices are about to fall, like they did during the 2008-2009 financial crisis.

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infrastructure  pipelines  pipeline-safety  crude-oil  refineries 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 19, 2017

To mark #InfrastructureWeek, we’ve posted on the broad energy and economic opportunities that come from building new infrastructure or by expanding existing infrastructure. We’ve also highlighted the essential role of infrastructure in ensuring that the benefits of America’s energy renaissance reach all across the country, helping U.S. consumers. Let’s end the week with a word about infrastructure safety, focusing on pipelines.

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pipelines  north-dakota  crude-oil  bakken-shale  refineries  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 9, 2017

Perhaps as soon as next week, oil will begin flowing through the Dakota Access Pipeline, connecting energy-producing areas in North Dakota with refineries in Illinois. In a recent legal filing the pipeline’s builder, Energy Transfer Partners, said oil would be put in the final part of the pipeline that crosses under Lake Oahe in North Dakota next week or the week after – but most likely next week. Completion of the 1,172-mile, $3.78 billion project represents important progress on a number of fronts, including infrastructure, U.S. energy security, jobs, state and local economies and the rule of law.

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pipelines  infrastructure  crude-oil  north-dakota 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 15, 2016

In view of the facts, law and established procedure, the government’s latest decision to keep delaying the Dakota Access Pipeline project in North Dakota may only be explained as politics triumphing over legal due process and the public good. 

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crude-oil  taxes  economic-impacts  consumers  president-obama 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 16, 2016

The president’s $10 per barrel oil tax proposal has been out for about a week now, and the analysis from a number of experts – both in terms of politics and economics – could be boiled down to the social media acronym “smh,” which stands for “shaking my head.”

Political analysis first: “The president perennially proposes repealing the oil industry tax credits which Congress annually ignores,” Benjamin Salisbury at FBR Capital Markets toldBloomberg. “It seems overwhelmingly likely that this fee meets the same fate.” ClearView Energy Partners’ Kevin Book said there are “near-zero odds that the Republican-led Congress will grant the president’s request.”

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analysis  keystone-xl-pipeline  hillary-clinton  crude-oil  jack-gerard  oil-sands  canada 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 23, 2015

At some point during the past seven years the Keystone XL pipeline ceased to exist only as an important project of energy infrastructure – one that could generate jobs, economic growth and strengthen U.S. energy security – and became a symbol for a narrow ideological agenda, a political football the White House has endlessly punted around to suit its own political needs. Little surprise, then, that Hillary Clinton has decided to join in the KXL kicking.

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analysis  energy-exports  crude-oil  oil-production  economic-benefits 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 18, 2015

First, they said it was about protecting consumers. Opponents of lifting the U.S. ban on crude oil exports claimed that allowing domestic crude to reach the global market would negatively impact Americans at the gas pump. But every major economic study looking at the issue has blown away that fig leaf.

The studies – from Brookings Energy Security Initiative to IHS to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) – estimate that U.S. oil exports would put downward pressure on U.S. gasoline prices, benefiting American consumers.

There have been other fig leaves.

Exports opponents say America shouldn’t export crude as long as our country is an oil importer. They also say the U.S. should isolate its crude from the global marketplace for national security reasons and that for those reasons oil should be treated differently than other U.S. commodities that are freely traded. These, too, have been blown away by the facts and sound economic analysis.

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analysis  energy-exports  crude-oil  economic-benefits  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 15, 2015

So here we are: Legislation that would end America’s 40-year-old ban on the export of domestic crude oil is moving through Congress – and better, there’s bipartisan momentum behind it.

Resistance to lifting the crude exports ban has no credible footholds – reflecting the breadth of the economic analysis supporting exports. There’s also the realization by most Americans that our country’s ongoing energy revolution has pretty much dashed the 1970s-era justifications for excluding American energy from the global marketplace, where it could be positively affecting global crude markets, stimulating production here at home and providing real energy aid to America’s allies.

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