The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

infrastructure  energy  hydraulic-fracturing  electricity  gas-prices  natural-gas  heating-fuels 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted December 16, 2015

In November, Americans were grateful for the lowest Thanksgiving gas prices in seven years. Thanks largely to the American energy resurgence, drivers continue to enjoy relief at the pump – with the national average close to $2.00, according to AAA.

As winter approaches, the good news continues with the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Winter Fuels Outlook. Due to a “combination of warmer weather and lower fuel prices,” EIA projects household heating costs will be lower than the previous two winters.

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american-energy  economy  jobs  fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline  gas-prices 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted September 24, 2014

The Washington Post: The crude oil boom in the western United States has changed the way states do business. North Dakota is growing so rapidly that the legislature is considering returning to special session to make big investments in new infrastructure. Wyoming now receives more than half its tax dollars from oil and gas companies paying to extract fuel. And big parts of Colorado, California, Texas, Oklahoma and a handful of other states increasingly rely on the energy industry for jobs.

Domestic production peaked in 1986, at 283 million barrels per month, according to the Energy Information Administration. In September 2005, domestic production hit a nadir of just 126 million barrels a month. In the last decade, technological advances, including the increasing production from hydraulic fracturing, has reversed that 20-year decline in crude oil production.

Today, production is back up to 256 million barrels a month, according to the latest EIA figures.

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access  energy  gasoline  regulation  energy-101  jobs-and-economy  gas-prices  fuel-prices  onshore-oil-production  onshore-gas-production 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 23, 2013

Gasoline prices have been rising with the approach of the summer driving season – up to about $3.66, according to AAA – pushed there by rising crude oil prices. U.S. consumers need help. And they could get it – if the administration pursued a number of energy policies to put downward pressure on global crude costs, while abandoning other choices that could harm consumers.

API Chief Economist John Felmy’s reporter briefing Thursday focused attention on two paths: one that will increase domestic production of oil and natural gas and one that won’t. Unfortunately, the administration – via proposals to increase energy taxes and a new wave of questionable regulation – looks headed down the wrong path, a recipe for disaster for American energy:

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